Hollywood's Bleeding - Album Review

 
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Post Malone released his third album Hollywood’s Bleeding. The long-awaited album contains 17 songs and pushes the limit on defining his music genre. Post said “I like everything—metal, old country, hip-hop, funk and R&B. What I’m not into is boxes. I don’t put people in boxes. There are no genres anymore. If a song makes you feel nice or it makes you feel sad or if it makes you feel anything, what does it really matter what category it is?” and this album reflects his standpoint. Hollywood’s Bleeding doesn’t stray entirely away from the expected houseparty trap music we typically expect from the beerbongs & bentleys artist. The more unique addition to Malone’s work is the surprising mix of pop-rock-indie-R&B songs and featured artists. I expect we’ll see lots of his jams topping the charts. Post’s raw emotions is what distinguishes this album from his previous two. His personality is able to shine through the lyrics, with less of an emphasis on partying & drugs.  

On a scale of 1-5, I’m giving this album a 3.75. Don’t get me wrong, there are 9 strong and impressive tracks on this album. Unfortunately, the other 8 didn’t hit the mark for me.

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Individual Song Ratings

 
  1. Hollywood’s Bleeding (4.5/5)

  2. Saint-Tropez (3.5/5)

  3. Enemies (3/5)

  4. Allergic (2.5/5)

  5. A Thousand Bad Times (4/5)

  6. Circles (2/5)

  7. Die For Me (3/5)

  8. On The Road (4/5)

  9. Take What You Want (5/5)

  10. I’m Gonna Be (4/5)

  11. Staring At The Sun (2/5)

  12. Sunflower (4.5/5)

  13. Internet (4.75/5)

  14. Goodbyes (3/5)

  15. Myself (5/5)

  16. I Know (5/5)

  17. Wow. (4.5/5)

 

Top Track Breakdowns 

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Hollywood’s Bleeding (4.5/5)

Hollywood’s Bleeding is the first and titular track on the album. The opening line, “Hollywood is bleeding, vampires feedin’ / Darkness turns to dust/ Everyone’s gone, but no one’s leavin’,” describes Hollywood and L.A. as cities that suck the life out of individuals. This is eventually followed by Post asking the question, “But who’d be at my funeral?” This example of lyrics evoke feelings that past songs didn’t. This is strong way to start the album - a little insight into the (seemingly empty) world of Post Malone.

Take What You Want (5/5)

Take What You Want is a standout for its surprising (but genius) feature from Ozzy Osbourne and Travis Scott. This is not a trio one would necessarily expect to hear. And yet, it works perfectly and even includes hair-metal guitar.

I Know (5/5) 

For only being 2 minutes, 21 seconds, I Know is extremely memorable. The catchy and strong hooks that Post is known for certainly lived up to my expectation. The best part of the song was the reply shout-out to the JoBros, “was sweet until I was a sucker, shout out Jonas Brothers.” Good job, Posty, you got all the JoBro fans swooning.  

Myself (5/5)

Myself is a calm, nighttime cruising, head nodding type of anthem. The song is about the struggles Post encounters performing all over the world. “It's what it is, it's how I live/ All the places I've been/ I wish I could've been there myself/.” Maybe a less #relatable topic, but allows the listener to get more insight into his life.

On the Road ft. Meek Mill & Lil Baby (4/5)

Post is still including mainstream trap music with anticipated features from Meek Mill and Lil Baby. On the Road is a sad-boy song, including lyrics such as “Leave when I lose and pop back up as soon as I win.”